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Hominin ecodynamics v.2

C. Michael Barton
Submitted By: cmbarton
Submitted: Jan 9, 2012
Last Updated: May 2, 2014
245 Downloads (6 Downloads in the last 3 months)
Latest Version

hominin_ecodynamics2.0 is designed as an experimental laboratory to explore the dynamics of biobehavioral interactions between two populations, and their genetic and demographic consequences. Specifically, the model is designed to study the effects of differing initial population sizes, different interaction distances, mating restrictions, and different fitness on the demography and spatial distributions of the original two populations and hybrids.

This model is associated with a publication:

Barton, C. Michael & Julien Riel-Salvatore (2012). Agents of change: modeling biocultural evolution in Late Pleistocene western Eurasia. Advances in Complex Systems. DOI: 10.1142/S0219525911003359.

Cite This Model:
Barton, C. Michael (2011, September 19). "Hominin ecodynamics v.2" (Version 1). CoMSES Computational Model Library. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/2286.0/oabm:2639
 

Model Status

You are viewing an old version of this model with out-of-date file downloads. To view the latest model version, click the "Latest" button above.

Model Version: 1
Version Notes:

In version 1, each agent has a pair ‘chromosome’ each with a single allele. In version 2 (this version), chromosomes have 10 or more alleles.

Platform: NetLogo 4.1.3
Programming Language: Logo (variant)
Operating System: Platform Independent
Licensed Under: GNU GPL, Version 2
Instructions on Running This Model:
Unzip the model file. The file w_eurasia.png must be in the same directory as the NetLogo model file for the model to run in a virtual world configured to resemble western Eurasia.

Available Model Versions
Version Number Submitted
1 09/19/2011 In version 1, each agent has a pair 'chromosome' each with a single allele. In version 2 (this version), chromosomes have 10 or more alleles.
2 03/27/2014 In version 1, each agent has a pair of 'chromosomes' each with a single allele. In version 2 (this version), chromosomes have 10 or more alleles.
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entropicity